#TheWebberWay

Street Address: 4201 Seneca St | Fort Collins, CO 80526

Main: 970-488-7800

Attendance: 970-490-3089

Main Fax/Counseling Fax: 970-488-7811/7818

#TheWebberWay

Street Address: 4201 Seneca St | Fort Collins, CO 80526

Main: 970-488-7800

Attendance: 970-490-3089

Main Fax/Counseling Fax: 970-488-7811/7818

Mathematics

Math 6:

Students will expand upon their knowledge of whole numbers and decimals formed in previous grades to include operations of multi-digit decimals and rational numbers.  During the year, students will use their knowledge of rational numbers to write and solve equations and inequalities, analyze geometric shapes, and organize and evaluate data displays.  Students will explore the concepts of area, surface area and volume.

Math 7:

In this course, students will gain an understanding about and be able to apply rational numbers.  Students will explore ratios and proportions to develop and understanding of linear functions and be able to solve single-variable equations.  They will compare data distributions and be able to compare differences between populations.  Finally, students will analyze geometric figures, calculating area, surface area, and volume.  Content is organized into four critical areas, or units.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Math 7/8:

This course differs from the 7th Grade course in that it contains content from 8th grade.  While coherence is retained, in that it logically builds from the 6th Grade, the additional content when compared to the 7th Grade course demands a faster pace for instruction and learning.  Content is organized into four critical areas, or units.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Math 8:

In 8th grade, students will build upon their knowledge and understanding of generating equivalent expressions, ratios and proportions, exponents, and volume of prisms gained in 6th and 7th grade.  In this course, students will apply their knowledge of expressions both algebraically and geometrically.  Students will explore congruence and similarity of figures in the coordinate plane and write algebraic expressions to describe the transformations.  Students will use their knowledge of generating equivalent expressions to describe the transformations.  Students will use their knowledge of generating equivalent expressions to solve single-variable linear equations.  They will analyze the solution set to include one solution, no solutions, and infinitely many solutions.  Students will build upon their understanding of proportional relationships to create linear functions in a graph, table of values, equation, and story problem.  They will then examine the similarities and differences between linear and non-linear models, exploring the commonalities and differences among rational and irrational numbers.  Students will approximate the location of simple square and cube root values on a number line.  Students will expand upon their understanding of volume of prisms to know and apply the formulas for volume of cylinders, cones, and spheres.  Students will apply their knowledge of linear relationships to analyze and make conjectures about two-way data, displays, tying together the components of this course.  The 8th grade standards ahve been divided into six critical areas, or units, as follows

 

Algebra 1:

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grade.  Because it is building on the middle grades standards, this is a more ambitious version of Algebra I than has generally been offered.  The critical areas, called units, deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.  This is a high school credited course.

Geometry:

The fundamental purpose of the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students' geometric experiences from the middle grades.  Students explore more complete geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments.  Important differences exist between this Geometry course and the historical approach taken in Geometry classes.  For example, transformations are emphasized early in this course.  Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school CCSS.  The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of the problem situations.  The critical areas, organized into six units are as follows:  Congruence, Proof, and constructions; Similarity, Proof and Trigonometry; Connecting Algebra and Geometry through Coordinates; Circles with and without Coordinates;  extending to three dimensions;  Applications or Probability.  This is a high school credited course.